Liposuction (Lipoplasty/Suction Lipectomy)

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Get Liposuction in Bloomington, IL

With minimal scarring and life-changing results, liposuction has become one of the most common cosmetic surgery procedures undergone within the United States today. It the preferred method for removing fat from areas of the abdomen such as the thighs, hips, and buttocks, fat from the lower arm, and fat from areas of the face and neck.  It is important to note that liposuction is not an alternative to weight loss from diet and exercise, and instead should be employed only as a last resort to fat accumulation unresponsive to these methods.  However, so long as patients maintain a healthy weight, they can expect long lasting results.

How does Liposuction work?

The basic technique of liposuction involves the removal of fat via a hollow metal tube (cannula) that is passed through the fatty tissue. The board-certified plastic surgeons at Twin City Plastic Surgery utilize a procedure known as power-assisted liposuction (PAL) which involves the aspiration of fat by attaching a motor on the cannula that causes the cannula to vacillate back and forth, performing much of the “work” of liposuction, known as power assisted liposuction (PAL).

Recovery from Liposuction

Fortunately, scarring from liposuction is minimal. Often, patients struggle to find the incision scars when asked to point them out! Additionally, any pain or discomfort patients may experience after surgery is easily lessened through prescribed medication (some patients find that over the counter pain relievers, such as Tylenol, are more than enough to relieve discomfort).

In addition, patients will be required to wear a compression garment after surgery, generally for the first three to four weeks; this garment is easily concealed under regular clothing. Patients can expect to return to driving and an office work environment after only a weekend of recovery. Light exercise may be resumed while wearing the compression garment after the first week. In regards to returning to normal activity, a good rule of thumb is: ‘If it hurts, don’t do it.’